Hidden Heritage Collections Blog

Authored by Karen Beverly

HHC object2

A screenshot of the homepage of the Hidden Heritage Collections website and blog.

The Hidden Heritage Collections website and blog was created in order to showcase the past and present Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) projects that have been completed under the supervision of Dr. Christine Angel.  While this particular website seeks to display these projects, it also serves as a platform for other objectives such as preserving the past, increasing access to cultural diversity, and linking data across cultures.  Thanks to partnering institutions, the students of St. John’s Division of Library and Information Science have been able to learn how to work with, display, and preserve various documents and objects so that they can be viewed on a grand scale.

St. John’s Division of Library and Information Science has several partners who have made the Hidden Heritage Collection’s goal of preserving the past possible.  The Center for Migration Studies, the St. Paulist Fathers, and Marymount Manhattan College are just some of the institutions that have devoted their time to allow students to get a meaningful hands-on experience.  These experiences include, but are not limited to, digitizing documents into an electronic format, taking inventories, and organizing collections.  These institutions are crucial components to this website, due to the fact that they ultimately allow students to create interesting and informative AS-L projects.

The Hidden Heritage Collections website and blog seeks to increase access to cultural diversity by displaying digitized forms of objects on the World Wide Web.  Due to the fact that there is such an array of valuable printed material tucked away in libraries, archives, and even houses, seekers of information are denied views of these documents due to their inaccessibility.  Since today’s advancements in technology are so beneficial and far reaching, students have digitized some of the printed materials in the collections that they were working with into a more easily accessible electronic format.  By doing this, students are able to give documents exposure on a grand scale, whereas if they didn’t, these documents could be unknown and quite easily overlooked.

Last but not least, by use of a tagging system, the contributors of the Hidden Heritage Collections blog seek to link together information from individual blog posts into a larger set of data.  Being that the nature of some of the documents from separate institutions may happen to overlap; the tagging system allows users to see a variety of documents that share similar themes, institutions, or other common characteristics.

The Hidden Heritage Collections website and blog is not just an outlet to display the hard work that the students of St. John’s University Division of Library and Information Science have done, but it is also a place where users and researchers alike can turn to in order to learn and gain understanding of a variety of topics.  In addition to preserving the past, increasing cultural diversity, and linking common themes, this website truly illustrates an ongoing trend in the field of Library and Information Science: the fact that online and remote access to information is crucial to researchers, users, and institutions across the globe.

 

A Helpful Tool for Users and Researchers:

How to Cite the Hidden Heritage Collections (HHC) Blog

 

  • Citing the HHC Blog in APA Format:

According to Paiz et al. [2], to cite a blog, one must “include the title of the post and the URL”.  A person must also supply the date of the post (if available) and the author’s name.  However, “if the author’s name is not available, they must provide the screen name”[2].

That being said, if one wanted to cite the Italian Ephemera Website Review that was written by Karen Beverly on February 12, 2014, they would do as follows under the Reference section of their paper:

Beverly, K. (2014, February 12). Italian ephemera website review. [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://hiddenheritagecollections.org/2014/02/italian-ephemera-website-review/

  • Citing the HHC Blog in Chicago Style:

According to the Chicago Manual of Style Online[1], in order to cite a blog in Chicago Style, one must include the author (or screen name), the date that the post was written, the title in quotations, the name of the blog, the date of access and the URL to the post.

That being said, if one wanted to cite the Italian Ephemera Website Review that was written by Karen Beverly, they would do as follows as a first footnote:

Karen Beverly, February 12, 2014, “Italian Ephemera Website Review,” Hidden Heritage Collections (blog), Hidden Heritage Collections, May 10, 2014, http://hiddenheritagecollections.org/2014/02/italian-ephemera-website-review/

One would also list this source under the Bibliography section of their paper:

Beverly, Karen. Italian Ephemera Website Review (blog).  Hidden Heritage Collections. http://hiddenheritagecollections.org/2014/02/italian-ephemera-website-review/

  • Citing the HHC Blog in MLA Format:

According to Russell et al. [3], to cite a blog post in MLA format, one would go about doing so as if they were citing a “standard web entry”.  This entails providing “the author of the work, the title of the posting in quotation marks, the Web site name in italics, …and the posting date” [3].

That being said, if one wanted to cite the Italian Ephemera Website Review that was written by Karen Beverly, they would do as follows under the Works Cited section of their paper:

Karen Beverly. “Italian Ephemera Website Review.” Hidde HeritageCollections. HiddenHeritageCollections, 12 Feb. 2014. Web. 10 May 2014.

Bibliography

Chicago Manual of Style Online.  “Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide.” Chicago Manual of Style Online. May 2014. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html.

Paiz, Joshua M., Elizabeth Angeli, Jodi Wagner, Elena Lawrick, Kristen Moore, Michael Anderson, Lars Soderlund, Allen Brizee, and Russell Keck. “Reference List: Electronic Sources (Web Publications).” The Purdue OWL. April 4, 2014. https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/.

Russell, Tony, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, and Joshua M. Paiz. “MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources (Web Publications).” The Purdue Owl.  February 13, 2014.  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/.

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[1] Chicago Manual of Style Online, “Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide,” Chicago Manual of Style Online, May 10, 2014, http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html.

[2] Joshua M. Paiz, Elizabeth Angeli, Jodi Wagner, Elena Lawrick, Kristen Moore, Michael Anderson, Lars Soderlund, Allen Brizee, and Russell Keck, “Reference List: Electronic Sources (Web Publications),” The Purdue OWL, April 4, 2014, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/.

[3] Tony Russell, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, and Joshua M. Paiz, “MLA Works Cited: Electronic Sources (Web Publications),” The Purdue Owl, February 13, 2014, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/.