Behind the Numbers: Vietnamese Refugees at Dong Rek Camp

Authored by Marilyn Diliberti

Background Memorandum on Refugee Admissions Program FY 1986

First of four pages summarizing projected refugee admissions for the 1986 fiscal year

More than a decade after Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho shook hands at the Hotel Majestic in Paris and the last weary American troops returned home, Vietnam still held the world’s attention in 1985. The Vietnamese endured economic and social hardship in the years following the official end of the Vietnam War and, with these new challenges, America turned its focus from war to the resettlement of refugees. The number is small; only 1035 Vietnamese refugees from the Dong Rek Camp were accepted for resettlement into the United States in 1985.[1]  Behind the numbers, though, is history that has been all but forgotten, hidden by the lingering shadow of the Vietnam War. Continue reading

A Perspective on Italian Immigration in the 1960s

Authored by Pamela Griffin Hansen

 A watermarked image of the Maxime Maurice Caretti letter.

Letter from Maxime
Maurice Caretti

A letter dated June 15, 1963, from Maxime Maurice Caretti of Brooklyn to the House of Representatives Committee on Immigration, is archived in the Endres Collection held by the Center for Migration Studies (CMS). Arthur P. Endres was legal counsel to the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law, from 1973 to 1989. (CMS Archivist 2015) The Endres Collection is comprised of thirteen linear feet of documents and records kept by Mr. Endres as part of his immigration-related legal work for the House of Representatives, ibid. Mr. Caretti’s letter is one of just a few pieces of original correspondence from private citizens found in the Endres Collection, ibid. Continue reading

Humanity and “Red Tape”: Interpol and the Third Reich

Authored by Chris Scipioni

Watermarked Image #1

Press release from Church of Scientology NCLE Chief Researcher Vaugh Young

It is widely known that following the conclusion of World War II, a number of Nazi officials and collaborators not only avoided prosecution, but retained positions of authority. The most startling instances involve the ranks of German and French Police, as well as the International Criminal Police Organization known as “Interpol.” By the mid-1970s, new and intense pressure was being applied to Interpol regarding reputed ties with the Third Reich. This was spearheaded by a new agency funded by The Church of Scientology, labelled the National Commission on Law Enforcement and Social Justice. The church’s motives have been rightfully questioned; founder L. Ron Hubbard had been long evading taxes and other legal jurisdictions by having business transactions in international waters, and several countries repeatedly lobbied Interpol for support through the late 1950s and 1960s. By the 1970s, Scientologists had reacted by launching a campaign to create negative publicity and public distrust for Interpol (Stalcup 2013 p.236). While these ulterior motives provide a dramatic backdrop, the information put forth by the NCLE has been generally accepted as factual and meticulously researched, and highlights more critical points.  Continue reading

Refugees Magazine-April 1985

Authored by Christina Stankewicz

Front cover of Refugees Magazine - April 1985

Front cover of Refugees Magazine – April 1985

The object featured is an issue of Refugees Magazine from 1985 that was published by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees (UNHCR). In this issue the main focus is on the emergency situation in Africa that occurred in the 1980s due to famine. This magazine serves as a way of calling out to give aid to this part of the world and make people aware of the issues at hand.

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Endres Collection – From the Office of the Attorney General

Authored by Alison Mirabella

OfficeWatermark1

Letter (1979) from The Office of The Attorney General offering amendments to The Refugee Act of 1980.

The Endres Collection consists of only thirteen boxes from the personal collection of Arthur P. Endres, who served as counsel for the House Judicatory Committee, Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees, and International Law. And yet, contained within these boxes, are the legal proceedings, correspondences and notes that would shape the lives of millions of future immigrants seeking a new life in the United States.

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Historical Background on Immigration laws and Effects of the Legislation Specifics

Authored by Erica Mohai

Verification/Record Keeping Requirements

Verification & Record Keeping Requirements-Summary of House Report 99-1000 (1986).

San Antonio Express Article- December 30, 1984

San Antonio Express Article- December 30, 1984

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arthur Endres Collection controlled by the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) contains government documents concerning immigration.  CMS came into possession of the collection in the 1980s.  The collection consists of documents Endres created or used during his tenure (1973-1989) as counsel for the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees, and International Law. Continue reading

The Role of the Legislative Process in Protecting Rights to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness Website Review

Authored by Karen Beverly

http://regis778.wix.com/lawgroup204

Website created by Alice Izumo, Amanda Register, Chris Lund, and Mary Thompson

letter

A letter from Amnesty International which entails information including the definition of a refugee.

This particular website focuses on the process of how information is used in order to create laws. To show how this process is done, this website uses various documents obtained from the Endres Collection at the Center for Migration Studies which all pertain to the creation of a very important piece of legislation, The Refugee Act of 1980. While the documents contained in the thirteen boxes at the Center for Migration Studies were created in the 1970’s and 1980’s, the overall enactment of the laws remains relevant, which ultimately allow these documents to serve as a concrete example of the present legislative process.

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The Refugee Act of 1980 Website Review

Authored by Karen Beverly

http://refugeeact1980.weebly.com/

Website Created by Caitlin Smith & Emma Kelly

bd

An open remark made by Bob Dole which entailed some of the various struggles Cambodians faced.

This website focuses on the overall theme of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of refugees living in America in the 1970’s and 1980’s. This website emphasizes various documents collected in the years 1979, the year before the implementation of the Refugee Act, and 1980.  Obtained from the Endres Collection at the Center for Migration Studies, these documents provide a strong argument regarding the necessity of why such laws need to be put into effect and how all individuals who reside in the United States are entitled to living their fundamental personal freedoms. Continue reading

Life, Liberty & the Pursuit of Happiness: Cuban and Haitian Refugees Website Review

Authored by Karen Beverly

http://lis204refugeeproject.wordpress.com/

Website Created by Danielle Manri & Alison Mirabella

nyt

A New York Times article that includes information on some of the issues that Haitian refugees faced.

This website seeks to inform its viewers on Cuban and Haitian refugees and the numerous struggles that these individuals faced in search of protection in the United States. Coming to America in hopes of living a better life than the one they were leaving behind, Cuban and Haitian Refugees wanted to live Thomas Jefferson’s famous phrase of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” instead of living in lands of poverty and political turmoil. Based off of documents from the Endres collection at Center for Migration Studies, this website showcases legal documents regarding the enactment of legislation concerning immigration from 1970 to 1980.

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Endres Collection – Public Opinion Brochure

Authored by Darya Betin

This is a picture of the front page of a public opinion brochure on immigration created by the Federation for American Immigration Reform (F.A.I.R.)

Front page of a public opinion brochure on immigration created by the Federation for American Immigration Reform (F.A.I.R.)

The Arthur P. Endres Collection, owned by the Center for Migration Studies in New York City, showcases a large body of documents from Endres’ time as Counsel to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees, and International Law from 1973 to 1989. Immigration policy was and continues to be one of the most divisive issues in our nation’s history. As Karen Tumulty noted in a Washington Post article on February 3, 2013, millions of people, many of whom are illegal immigrants and who have lived in the United States for years, seek to be heard and to have their status legalized as a recognition of the service they have provided to this country. By the very definition of their status, these individuals are disenfranchised and depend on lawmakers to plead their cases. The other side of the debate argues against their presence or any possibility of legalizing their status. Both sides attempt to convince the government of the justness of their cause by relying on the power of accurate and relevant information and data. Continue reading